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Ed Wiener

Iconic Ed Wiener Sterling Abstract Expressionism 3D Drop Dangle Earrings '50s

Iconic Ed Wiener Sterling Abstract Expressionism 3D Drop Dangle Earrings '50s

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Iconic Ed Wiener Sterling Silver Abstract Expressionism 3-D Drop Dangle Earrings Circa 1950s


Measurements: 2"L x .5"W x .5"D (5.08cm x 1.27cm  x 1.27cm)

Markings: Sterling

Weight: 10g

Stunning pair of Ed Wiener abstract modernist 3-D drop dangle earrings. Ornately designed and hand-crafted, partially oxidized giving them fantastic depth and drama. Please excuse the lines or reflections, as they are shiny and hard to photograph. The pictures really don't do them justice. They could easily and inexpensively be converted to post back earrings by a jeweler.

I've only ever seen one other pair like these and they sold on 1st Dibs a few years back. They were featured in one of his print ads in the 1950's. (Which is copyrighted, so I couldn't post here unfortunately)

Model is a life-size representation



Ed Wiener (American, 1918-1991) New York jewelry designer noted for his merging of Bauhaus and Abstract Expressionist styles.  

Perhaps none of the modernist jewelers working in New York City after World War II was so well loved and respected as Ed Wiener. Though almost entirely self-taught, he possessed a magnificent appreciation of form, line, and color together with an amazing ability to uniquely apply the ideas and principles of modernism to his life's work. He was also a transitional figure-very much an inspiration and teacher to the next generation; many jewelers came into their own under Wiener's tutelage.

He was born and raised in New York City. His Father a butcher, Wiener worked in his shop until the beginning of World War II when his job assembling radios facilitated the discovery of his manual skills. He married his wife Doris in 1944, and a year later, he and his wife took general crafts classes at Columbia University. In the fall of 1946, they rented a studio in what is now known as the East Village. In the Winter of 1947 he opened his first NY store in Greenwich Village, calling their shop "Arts and Ends". Where his business and friendships with fellow craftsmen flourished. Which included the likes of Henry Steig, Art Smith, Sam Kramer, and Calder, Frank Miraglia, Frank Rebajes, George Salo, Paul Voltaire, Bill Tendler, and Paul Lobel just to name a few. Wiener credits Calder with giving him "Profound insight" He admired Calder's economy of space and the energy and intensity of his creations. Courtesy of the book: "Modernist Jewelry 1930-1960 The Wearable Art Movement" by Marbeth Schon - Published 2004 by Schiffer Publishing

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